My Newest Project YeOldeFamilyTree.com

March 25, 2013 · Filed Under Family Search · Comment 

 

Finally after months of work my newest project YeOldeFamilyTree.com is ready for beta testing.

YeOldeFamilyTree.com is free online family tree website that is designed to make creating and sharing your family tree fun, free and accessible.

Now you are probably thinking “here we go again, another free online family tree website!”

So what makes YeOldeFamilyTree.com different?

YeOldeFamilyTree.com provides a simple and efficient free online family tree – created for fellow genealogists. Here are some of the features:

Don’t want certain records shown?

You can hide their details using our “Mark as Living” private feature. You have full control over privacy.

 

What records can we view?

Most other so called free online family tree websites cost if you need to see records a relative owns, has purchased or discovered even though the person who did the research is not receiving any of your money!

YeOldeFamilyTree.com is 100% free and you can view any photos, documents and records submitted by our members.

 

Can we export a gedcom file?

Some sites have the ugliest gedcom files. Their gedcom files result in a lot of garbage when imported into any software but their own?

Exporting a gedcom file to use on your desktop family tree program is no problem with YeOldeFamilyTree.com.

 

What rights does YeOldeFamilyTree.com have to our records or images?

None! All records and images you own are yours. We have no rights without written permission first!

 

YeOldeFamilyTree.com is designed with a focus on giving you the most useful features.YeOldeFamilyTree.com is always on the lookout for modifications “mods” to enchance your free online family tree experience.

 

Free Australian Death Notices – Ryerson Index

September 5, 2010 · Filed Under Family Search · 3 Comments 

 

In Australia there are a number of free Australian death notices websites and without doubt one of the best Australian death notices sites is the Ryerson Index.

The Ryerson Index is an index to death notices appearing in current Australian newspapers. It also includes some funeral notices, probate notices and obituaries. While not all Australian death notices are listed, the Ryerson Index contains over 2,596,891 entries from 178 newspapers (at time of posting) and the indexing is being continuously carried out by a team of volunteers.

One of the advantages of the Ryerson Index compared to some of the other Australian death notices websites is that it contains records going back to the mid 1800′s. Other Australian death notices sites like obits.com.au, obituary.com.au and thelastpost.com.au records are obtained from funeral directors or though contributions by members of the public which limits their content.

The Ryerson Index can be searched in two ways: by name, or by location and once the search is complete it lists the Surname, given name, date of death, age, location, which publication it was printed in and the published date.

Once you have found the death notice you are after, you can receive a photocopy of the death notice by using the Ryerson Index free lookup service. Again this is a volunteer project and don’t expect too much as not all decades are available for lookup.

If you cannot get a copy of a Australian death notices using the Ryerson Index free lookup service, try the Australian newspaper archives website or visit your local library and they might have copies of your State’s papers on microfiche.

NSW BDM Transcription Agent

June 11, 2010 · Filed Under Family Search · Comment 

In Australia, I think we are pretty lucky when it comes to trying to trace our family tree for free. For instance, both NSW and Queensland have a free historical birth, death and marriage (BDM) index online, where we can easily find information to help us in our family search.

But eventually there may come a time when you have to purchase a BDM certificate to allow you to trace your family tree further. NSW BDM certificate costs will vary from state to state, with NSW BDM certificates starting from about $28 (at the time of posting).

Another alternative is to get a transcribed copy of the certificate. There are a number of professional BDM transcription agents across Australia who will often be able to transcribe certificates cheaper than purchasing the original.

Being a bit of a scrooge, this was the position I found myself in when I needed to find information on my mum’s parents.

Somehow I had ended up with a copy of my grandfather’s death certificate, so I knew Pop’s details but all I knew about Nana was that her and Pop were married in Ryde, NSW and their 50th Wedding Anniversary was in 1982. Nana’s parents were named Albert and Amelia Thompson and that Nana was born in England somewhere.

Once I had Nana and Pop’s marriage reference number from the NSW BDM index, I then found a NSW BDM transcription agent through Google.

A NSW BDM transription agent can transcribe the following for you: NSW Birth Certificates 1788 – 1909. NSW Marriage Certificates 1788 – 1959 and NSW Death Certificates 1788 – 1979.

When hiring a NSW BDM transcription agent, one good thing is that besides purchasing a full transcription, you can pay for only the “fields” you require. A NSW Full Certificate Transcript cost is $18.00, NSW Partial Certificate Transcripts (5 Fields) is $15.00,  and a NSW Partial Certificate Transcripts (3 Fields) costs $12.00.

For example, if you need a marriage certificate transcribed, you have the choice of 12 different fields.
1.Marriage Date & Place
2. Groom’s Birthplace
3. Groom’s Occupation
4. Groom’s Age
5. Groom’s Father
6. Groom’s Mother
7. Bride’s Birthplace
8. Bride’s Age
9. Bride’s Father
10. Bride’s Mother
11. Witnesses
12. Religion & Minister

I only needed to know 3 fields 7, 9 and 10 and the cost is only $12 instead of $28 for a certificate. Not a bad saving, especially if you need to purchase a few.

And when I received the order, the NSW BDM transcription agent actually sent me all of Nana’s details, fields 7 to 12, even though I didn’t really need them, which I thought was nice.

Next Page »